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Posted on: Wed 24th February 2016 5.19AM

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CATEGORIES AVAILABLE

Posted on: Mon 19th February 2018 5.28AM

Aquamarine, Amethyst, Emerald, Garnet, Kunzite, Peridot, Ruby, Topaz, Lapis lazuli, Quartz, Tourmaline, Afghanite, Agate, Alexandrite, Amazonite, Amber, Bastnasite, Beads, Benitoite, Beryl, Black Star Diopside, Bloodstone, Calcite, Carnelian, Diamonds, Dioptase, Druzy, Fire Agate and Fluorite. For more information please inbox or whatsApp.


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6 Responses

Afghanite

Nasir Hussain Sat 17th February 2018 12.51PM - REPLY

Named after Afghanistan where it was first discovered in a lapis lazuli mine in 1968, this rare and complex aluminosilicate forms blue crystals ranging from light aquamarine shades to saturated sapphire blue hues. The scarcity of gem-quality afghanite makes it a true collector's stone.


Alexandrite

Naveed Khan Sat 17th February 2018 12.52PM - REPLY

Alexandrite is the rare color-change variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. Its rarity is a result of its unlikely chemical makeup. Alexandrite can only form when aluminum and beryllium combine with trace elements like iron, titanium and, most importantly, chromium. On rare occasion, vanadium may also be present. The unlikelihood of the rare element chromium being in the right place to combine with aluminum and beryllium under exactly the right conditions to create alexandrite is what makes it so rare and valuable.


Andesine Feldspar

Qasim Khan Sat 17th February 2018 12.56PM - REPLY

Andesine is a member of the group of minerals known asfeldspars. In the gemstone world, moonstone is another famous feldspar. But moonstone is an orthoclase feldspar while andesine is one of the plagioclase feldspars, which include oligoclase, andesine, labradorite and bytownite. All the members of the plagioclase group are a mixture of albite and anorthite, with andesine being 50-70% albite (sodium aluminum silicate) and 30-50% anorthite (calcium aluminum silicate). Labradorite is defined as between 50-70% anorthite and 30-50% alibite, so many specimens of similar appearance may fall into one category or the other. occurs in a range of colors, from red or honey-red to orange, yellow, champagne or green. It has a hardness of 6 to 6.5 on the Mohs scale, with a dull to vitreous luster. It is translucent to transparent and has perfect cleavage. Due to its hardness, it is not an ideal gem for rings, though it is as hard as tanzanite.


Calligraphy Stone

Abu Huraira Sat 17th February 2018 12.58PM - REPLY

Naturally dazzling spinel has graced the pages of history and many royal crowns due to its resemblance to ruby. Today, however, spinel stands on its own as a remarkable gem. Spinel comes in a wide range of stunning hues and can also exhibit optical phenomena like asterism and color-change. It is generally underappreciated compared to other colored stones, lending itself to more affordable prices, but this gem, said in Burma to be polished by the spirits, has a beauty that is difficult to ignore.


Amazonite

Sadra Khan Sat 17th February 2018 1.00PM - REPLY

Blue-green specimens of microline are called amazon stone or amazonite, named for its supposed discovery location near the Amazon River. Amazonite that is used in jewelry is generally cut into cabochons. Gem-quality amazonite is found in the Ilmen and Ural Mountains of Russia, the Pikes Peak district of Colorado and in Minas Gerais, Brazil.


Ametrine

Saeed Khan Sat 17th February 2018 1.02PM - REPLY

Ametrine is a bi-color quartz variety that, as its name suggests, is a unique combination of amethyst and citrine within a single crystal. How the gem forms is still a bit of a mystery, but the differences in color are believed to be the result of the presence of iron in different states of oxidation from natural heating. Combining the golden sunburst of citrine with the violet sunset of amethyst, this naturally colored gem is commercially mined at a single source: the remote Anah mine in Bolivia and is shrouded in fascinating local legends and lore.